AUBG’s Dr. Stantcheva’s Visit at Denison

Working with German professor Dr. Diana Stantcheva from the American University in Bulgaria (AUBG) as a collaborative team within GLCA’s Global Course Connections Program over the past four years has been a most productive and enjoyable journey. Both Denison and AUBG students have been collaborating on a great variety of projects for 7 continuous semesters. These courses have ranged from intermediate to advanced level , from language to content-focused, and from simple technologies to complex digitally innovative courses.

Students on both sides have gotten to know each other and both professors over the years, and it’s not been seldom that students who had worked together on a digitally supported project found each other to be partners again three semesters later. Via Google Hangouts and later Zoom video-conferencing students on both sides have met regularly over time to discuss American and East-European culture, US and German politics, the refugee situation in Europe, German media, Homosexuality in German film, gender and family, and linguistic phenomena, and much more – all in German!

img_0195This fall, on November 7th, Dr. Stantcheva came to Dr. Dillmann’s “Media in Germany” course to discuss the US presidential election from a European perspective with the class. In turn, students in the course explained and discussed the American voting system with Dr. Stantcheva who was extremely impressed both by how politically informed our students were and how well they were able to describe the complex election system and state their own opinions on the two competing candidates in very clear German.

Dr. Stantcheva’s husband Vladi, an accomplished artist based in Sofia and Berlin, joined us for a campus tour where he talked with several students in German. He was particularly interested in students working at the election information table in Slayter Hall and likewise impressed by how politically savvy and engaged our students are. The stereotype that young Americans are indifferent to the politics in their own country was certainly not confirmed on our campus.

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Definitely a highlight of Diana’s and Vladi’s visit – according to both Diana and Vladi – was visiting the Mulberry MixLab with its director, Christian Faur, showing them the lab space with its manifold artistic production programs and demonstrating to them how the various 3-D printers set up in Mulberry and the Bryant Arts Center function. Diana was especially delighted about the special gift she received from Christian: her name laser-cut into a piece of wood.

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We concluded the evening with a meal at Day Y Noche, where two of our Denison students had the pleasure to be captured spontaneously in a portrait drawing by the artist at the dinner table. They said that they would always treasure this unexpected gift.

Thank you, Diana and Vladi, for your visit and sharing your thoughts and experiences with our students!

Posted in Art, Digital_Liberal_Arts, Pedagogical, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 9 Comments

5 Denison Colleagues at CLAC 2016

Denison University’s President Adam Weinberg very generously made it possible for five Denison faculty members to attend and to present at the Cultures and Languages across the Curriculum (CLAC) conference hosted by Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa this October 20th and 21st.

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This year’s conference was organized by our very talented and generous colleague Marc Pinheiro-Cadd.

Thank you, Marc!

 

img_0032Nausica Marcos-Miguel, Assistant Professor of Spanish in Linguistics, Charly St-Georges, Assistant Professor of Spanish in Literature and Cultural Studies, Lori Radall, Coordinator of Multilingual Learning, Hanada Al-Masri, Assistant Professor of Arabic, and Gabriele Dillmann, Associate Professor of German had the opportunity to further learn about CLAC pedagogy and internationalizing our campus community and curriculum after they had explored CLAC at the 9th annual conference hosted by Denison University in 2015. President Weinberg was introduced to and spoke in support of CLAC practitioners during that conference as he gave a very well-received keynote address. Gabriele Dillmann then offered 2 follow-up workshops in the summer of 2015 for colleagues across the Denison campus (DIG – Denison Interest Group) to engage faculty members further with CLAC pedagogies and strategies to internationalize their courses.

img_9975The CLAC conference in DesMoines with its very sophisticated conference program, informative sessions and compelling discussions by seasoned CLAC practitioners and CLAC founding members was a very positive experience for our Denison colleagues. Denison colleagues also had the opportunity to meet colleagues across the country, across institution types, and across disciplines to exchange ideas and strategies to embed CLAC components in their own courses.

Keynote speakers Dawn Michele Whitehead, Senior Director for Global Learning whiteheadand Curricular Change in the Office of Integrative Liberal Learning and the Global Commons at Association of American Colleges and Universities and Richard Kiely, Senior Fellow, Office of Engagement Initiatives, Engaged Cornell, rounded off the0969_11_005_select-27guf98-240x300 program with their inspiring presentations on global and local social challenges and suggested possible approaches to think about alleviating some of the most pressing problems. Richard Kiely shared many of his insights that he is further reflecting on in his forthcoming co-authored book Building a Better World: The Pedagogy and Practice of Global Service-Learning.  

avatar-jpg-320x320pxA special event of the conference was the unveiling of the CLAC Clearinghouse by Dan Soneson, Director of the College of Liberal Arts Language Center, University of Minnesota and Caleb Zilmer, Ph.D. Student in Second Languages and Cultures Education, University of Minnesota. The Clearinghouse is an interactive collection of CLAC-related materials curated by CARLA and the Consortium for Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum. We are all strongly encouraged to contribute to and make use of this valuable resource.

img_0001Arabic professor Hanada Al-Masri and German professor Gabriele Dillmann gave a joint-presentation on the benefits of global course connections both for students and faculty: “Fostering a Global Mindset through Globally Connected Courses: Lessons from the German and Arabic Classroom,” which conference participants appeared to find very useful in their own thinking about employing new digital technologies and pedagogies to make an international experience possible in general and especially for those students for whom study-abroad is not an option for various personal and economic reasons.

img_0020One presentation that I would personally like to highlight – among other things because it warmed my heart – was “El Puente Entre Dos Mundos: Spanish Companion Courses for Nursing Majors” by Elizabeth Fouts, Associate Professor of Spanish Studies at St. Anselm College. With much enthusiasm and passion, Elizabeth shared with the audience “how her professional and personal life has changed since she discovered CLAC”, which was reinforced when she came to the CLAC conference at Denison in 2015 and “left with a ton of ideas.” These have since culminated in a rather fast-growing, very impressive Spanish language nursing option program at her college.

Following are some of the impressions and experiences that our Denison colleagues walked away with in their own words.

Hanada Al-Masri

img_9990After attending the CLAC conference for the first time at Denison, I was very motivated to attend the second one at Drake University, Iowa and I am truly appreciative of our president’s support. Of a particular interest to me was to learn about how different colleges proposed different approaches and different perspectives to globalizing their curricula. Some presentations encouraged community service learning on the local level, others worked more on the global level. It was a good learning experience to learn more about the incorporation of culture and how to be prepared to deal with unforeseen challenges. The keynote speakers provided great insights into how to incorporate global and international perspectives into our curriculum offerings. It was interesting to hear the challenges they faced during their process of internationalization.

Charly St-Georges

img_0031The CLAC Conference provided a unique and valuable space for reflecting not only on the importance of global perspectives and experiences in higher education, but on its possibilities. So many different institutions were represented, each with their own contexts and challenges, and it was precisely this diversity in experiences wrestling with a shared goal that I found to be so fruitful. This coming together of ideas, philosophies, and experiences facilitated a cross pollination that have gotten the wheels turning in my head—and in my pedagogy—in a way that would not have been possible without carving out a space to sit down with colleagues and reflecting on the role of cultures and languages across the curriculum.

Nausica Marcos-Miguel

The CLAC conference at Drake University has been a great opportunity to see different approaches to incorporate language and culture across the curriculum. Since I teach language courses, for me, it is a maimg_0022tter of including culture and content in a language class, so it was a new perspective seeing how faculty from different disciplines incorporates language in their content courses. This is clearly a path towards recognizing the fundamental need of learning a second language and becoming aware of different cultures, different perspectives. For example, Kate Yang, from Stockton University, showed how she searched for “cross-cultural awareness and global engagement in a developmental psychology course” by, for example, making learners reflect on the different connotations that the word “adolescent” has for speakers of different languages. Her colleague Laura Zucconi explained how history majors worked with texts in their second languages. By doing so, students could find new perspectives on a topic they were already familiar with.  I also had the opportunity to catch up with my colleagues and learned more about the shared language project they are working on. There were many other interesting presentations and conversations at the CLAC conference, and I came back to Granville with new ideas for my classes. The take-home message for me was: we need to give our students the tools to be global citizens.  

Lori Randall

The clear focus of the CLAC conference made it easy to find relevant, engaging sessions. Indeed, for the first time in my conference-attending experience, I found it difficult to choose between sessions. Each session promised to provide valuable pedagogical ideas and social, pedagogical, or ethical issues to consider. Each session that I attended lived up to that promise. High quality sessions were not the only positive aspect of this conference; the duration and size of the conference were likewise ideal. Attendance was small enough and the events of the conference were condensed enough to foster a genuine sense of community. Yet attendance was large enough to ensure diversity. Attendees represented a variety of institutions, from the Defense Language Institute and the US Air Force to the K-12 public school system, to post-secondary institutions of all types. All of these factors – high quality sessions; small, yet diverse participants; and a condensed, efficient schedule – combined to create a rich, invigorating atmosphere for sharing ideas, strengthening existing relationships, and creating new ones. I, personally, was pleased to have this opportunity not only to connect, share ideas, and plan for the future with colleagues from Denison but also to connect with staff members from the Defense Language Institute, learning from their expertise and sharing my own with them.

Three cheers to CLAC for reminding me of the true value of academic conferences, collaboration, and lifelong learning!

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Shared Languages Program Launch

In the Spring 2017 semester, Earlham, Denison, and Oberlin will offer their first Shared Languages Program courses. This program is an initiative funded by a Mellon grant, Global Crossroads, with which the Great Lakes Colleges Association is supporting campus internationalization and globalization efforts throughout its 13 domestic consortial college member institutions.

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In Arabic, Dr. Kelly Tuttle will teach Arabic 341: Alienation in Modern Arabic Literature (in Arabic) at Earlham College while Dr. Hanada Al-Masri will be offering Arabic 300: Media Arabic (in Arabic) at Denison University. Dr. Basem Al-Raba’a will be encouraging Oberlin students, who would otherwise not have the opportunity to continue their Arabic language studies, to participate as guest students in these upper level Arabic courses. Allegheny’s Arabic professor, Dr. Reem Hilal, as well as DePauw’s Arabic professor, Ghassan Nasr, are looking into identifying students for whom these course offerings would be a great opportunity to continue their Arabic studies.

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germanposterIn German, Dr. Gabriele Dillmann will offer German 305: Migration to and from Germany and the EU since 1945 (with a special focus on the current refugee crisis) at Denison University in collaboration with Hope College’s German professor Dr. Lee Forester who will encourage Hope German students to engage not only with Denison students in this course but also with AUBG students as part of the Global Liberal Arts Alliance Global Course Connections program. As a globally connected course, Dr. Dillmann’s students have meaningful opportunities to engage with students from diverse cultural backgrounds at the American University in Bulgaria. Albion’s German professor Dr. Perry Myers has expressed interest in participating in the program in the near future.

The Shared Languages program has been in the making since January 2016 and has since then been directed by Gabriele Dillmann for the GLCA Crossroads Initiative. Interested faculty have met during two summer workshops for Arabic, respectively German to discuss language pedagogy, course content, digital pedagogy, and course logistics. A follow-up working group meeting will take place in December at Denison U to discuss course assessment strategies and faculty will offer a show and tell of their pre-pilot work in their current Arabic and German courses. Logistical and technological details have since been worked out with the help of our participating schools’ four highly engaged registrars and apt IT personnel, and an informative Student Q&A has been created.

Many thanks to Simon Gray (Program Officer at GLCA) and all my Arabic and German colleagues, registrars, and IT personnel who are making this exciting new program happen!!

 

 

 

 

Posted in Digital_Liberal_Arts, GLCA Shared Language Courses Initiative, Pedagogical, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Ethel at German Kaffeeklatsch!

Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 8.10.28 PMThursday, December 3rd, was a fabulous day for the German section at Denison University’s Modern Languages Department! The wunderbar string quartet Ethel joined the German social coffee hour to discuss and show via example the influence of revolutionary Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg on the avant-garde and contemporary composers – including Ethel! Students were enthralled.

Evan Woodnorth and Hannah Doermann lead the weekly Kaffeeklatsch, which invites students from all courses and levels of German to join in for conversation and German coffee. Every Thursday during common hour, they discuss contemporary issues such as the refugee crisis in Europe to pop and alternative German music to important historic events. Hannah, who is a native of Bonn, Germany has been co-conducting German KK since her freshman year at Denison and Evan, a native of Minnesota, who is practically linguistically and culturally near-native German after spending a year living in the country right after high school, when he had been awarded the coveted Congress-Bundestag scholarship, has been contributing very creatively to KK for the past year now. Together, they’ve made a great team!

On average, Kaffeeklatsch has a student turnout of about 20 students each week in the Foresman Lounge on the third floor of Fellows Hall, but with Ethel visiting we had to move to a larger space than our regular gathering place – almost all students from all courses as well as students interested in “all things German” came to the social hour, about 100 students. All visitors enjoyed German chocolates, ginger breads, and the famous German Stollen with Jacobs Kaffee throughout the event.

The event was introduced by German student Melodie Petra Faur who presented an informative introduction to Schoenberg’s life and work in German so engagingly that the language barrier for non-German speakers was reduced to a minimum – the music itself made up for the rest! [arnold schönberg]

Beautiful cello artist Dorothy gave a very insightful introduction to the importance on Schoenberg on the American avant-garde and Ralph shared his own experiences with Schoenberg’s genius in his development as a musician from his teenage years. Corin and Kip rounded off the influence of Schoenberg on their own artistic development .. until we ran out of time.

Arnold Schönberg’s work and significance as a major cultural figure was a topic in the advanced German course 311, a writing course and survey of 20th century German/Austrian/Swiss writers and artists. For students to get an in-depth exploration of his work with highly recognized musicians such as Ethel is a treat very few college students get to enjoy in such an intimate and close setting.

I would like to whole-heartedly thank Mike Morris Sr., Director of the Denison Vail Series, and Ching-Chu Hu, Chair of the Denison Music Department, for making this event possible for our German students and faculty (Gary Baker, Gabriele Dillmann, Jeffrey Frazier). Furthermore, I owe much gratitude to Tim, Denison’s amazing photographer, and Jamie Hale from University Communications for taking and then sharing the photographs below with me for this blog. But most of all a heartfelt Dankeschön to Ethel: Dorothy, Ralph (aka Frank), Kip and Corin!!

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Languages in the Global Liberal Arts Alliance (GLAA) Institutions

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Global Liberal Arts Alliance (GLAA)

Established in 1995, Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane (AUI) is an independent, public, not-for-profit, coeducational Moroccan university committed to educating future citizen-leaders of Morocco and the world through a globally oriented, English-language, liberal-arts curriculum based on the American system.  The University enhances Morocco and engages the world through leading-edge educational and research programs, including continuing and executive education, upholds the highest academic and ethical standards, and promotes equity and social responsibility.  AUI presently has 138 faculty members from 15 different countries and 1764 students who are from Morocco and 21 other nations.  The University offers 7 Bachelor and 12 Master degree programs in its three schools: Business Administration, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Science and Engineering, and its Executive Education Center.

English and French (Language of Instruction) plus Spanish and Berber 

Spanish

SPN 1301 Beginning Spanish I
SPN 1302 Beginning Spanish II
SPN 2303 Intermediate Spanish
SPN 2310 Advanced Spanish

Berber

BRB 1301 Beginning Berber I
BRB 1302 Beginning Berber II

The American College of Greece (ACG) was founded in 1875 in Smyrna, Asia Minor as a school for girls by American, Congregational, women missionaries. In 1922 the College relocated to Athens, Greece. In 1961 the College began its operation under an independent, self-perpetuating board of trustees. The College moved to its current 64-acre main campus on Mt. Hymettus overlooking Athens in 1965; a downtown campus was added in 1993. ACG has two educational divisions: PIERCE, one of Greece’s premier private high schools (800 students in grades 7-12) and DEREE, the higher education division, which offers 21 undergraduate majors in the arts and sciences and business and six masters degree programs in applied psychology, business, communication, finance, leadership, and marketing. In 1981 DEREE became the first international American college or university to be accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Currently DEREE enrolls over 3,000 students from 56 countries, making it the largest American college or university in Europe. Thirty-three thousand ACG alumni serve in Greece and around the world in virtually every field of human endeavor.

There is no collective website for the languages/Modern Languages on ACG’s site. I found German, French, Italian, Modern Greek, Spanish, each levels 1-3 plus Business language.

The American University in Bulgaria (AUBG) is a selective and residential liberal arts institution that was established in 1991 to educate students of outstanding potential in a community of academic excellence, diversity, and respect and to prepare them for democratic and ethical leadership in serving the needs of the region and the world. AUBG is accredited both in the US and in Bulgaria. Courses are taught in English by high-quality faculty coming from four continents, experienced in teaching in a multicultural, learner-centered environment. Currently, there are about 1,100 students studying at AUBG, representing 40 countries. It offers 9 undergraduate programs in Business Administration, Computer Science, Economics, European Studies, History and Civilizations, Information Systems, Journalism and Mass Communication, Mathematics, Political Science and International Relations, and an Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) program. The success of the University is attested by the 3,000 alumni who have already found their place in prestigious companies, started their own successful businesses, or have continued their education at renowned universities worldwide. Even Bulgaria’s newly launched university ranking system recognized the quality of education at AUBG. The University leads all Bulgarian universities in terms of the employability of its graduates and the incomes they earn, according to the system.

Modern Languages Sub-Department

The Minor in Modern Languages and Cultures at AUBG is an interdisciplinary program for students who wish to acquire linguistic, cultural and literary proficiency in one of the following languages: German, French, Spanish or Bulgarian. It can be easily combined with many disciplines offered at AUBG such as Business Administration, Economics, Journalism and Mass Communication, European Studies and Political Science and International Relations.

Founded in 1919, The American University in Cairo (AUC) is an independent and non-profit university that promotes the ideals of American liberal arts, professional education, lifelong learning, and service to Egypt and the region. The AUC has 435 faculty members and 6064 students who are mostly from Egypt and the United States. Thirty undergraduate majors, including Business Administration, Journalism & Mass Communication, Mechanical Engineering and Political Science, and twenty-seven graduate majors, including Business Administration, Political Science, Computer Science, Mass Communication and Middle East Studies, are offered at AUC.

Center for Arabic Language Instruction

No other languages are offered as majors/minors.

Founded in 1866, the American University of Beirut bases its educational philosophy, standards, and practices on the American liberal arts model of higher education. A teaching-centered research university, AUB has around 700 instructional faculty members, a student body of around 8,000 men and women, and a major medical center that serves Lebanon and the region. Professional schools include engineering, medicine, business, agriculture and food sciences, health sciences, and arts and sciences. The University encourages freedom of thought and expression and seeks to graduate men and women committed to creative and critical thinking, life-long learning, personal integrity, civic responsibility and leadership.

Arabic Language Studies

English 

No other languages for study are offered.

The American University of Nigeria (AUN) was established in 2005 to serve as an agent of economic development, and a model of post-secondary education for Nigeria and the region, provide the skills and leadership essential to solving the continent’s pressing problems, and equip students with tools to achieve both personal and material success. The AUN presently has 72 faculty members and 1188 students from Nigeria, Ghana, the United States, Pakistan, Lebanon and Zambia. It has 15 undergraduate majors, and Computer Science, Information Systems and Software Engineering majors, housed within the School of Information Technology and Communications, are the largest programs of study.

English Literature

Minors are not listed, but judging by the Gen Ed program, French is offered.

The American University of Paris (AUP) fast approaching its 50th anniversary, was founded by an American foreign service officer who believed, after World War II, that American students required a different kind of education, one that would “de-provincialize” them, awaken them to cultural differences, and prepare them to take their places in a world held increasingly in common. Once a two-year institution for the children of expatriate Americans returning to the States via articulation agreements with Ivy League schools, AUP is today a master’s university, home to students from 100 different nationalities, and faculty from 30, fourteen different undergraduate majors and nine master’s programs. A survey of entering-class languages and dialects taken annually between 2001 and 2009 reveals that 89 different languages were represented on our campus between those dates—the figure rises to 97 if one factors in the results of a faculty language survey taken in 2002. AUP is one of the most genuinely diverse, and thereby pedagogically rich, small liberal arts institutions in the world today. The mix of ethnicities, nationalities, languages, cultures and faiths that characterize the AUP classroom makes this University a living laboratory for higher education in a globalized world. AUP’s curriculum, from the first-year learning communities through the graduate programs, takes advantage of this diversity in its approach to issues of identity and global interdependence. Indeed, in recognition of our curricular reform, we were distinguished by the AAC&U in 2003 as one of eleven leadership schools in “Liberal Education for Global Citizenship.”

Literary and Creative Studies in the Arts in French

Minor in European Languages and Cultures: English and French, one extra language, which comes from previous language learning or while at AUP, but AUP does not seem to offer any additional languages itself.

Speaking the World = English and French and students are encouraged to take external language courses for a third or 4th language.

Ashesi University College Ashesi means “beginning” in the native Ghanaian language Akan. Founded in 2002, Ashesi is a private, non-profit liberal arts college located in Ghana, West Africa. The university’s mission is to educate a new generation of ethical and entrepreneurial leaders in Africa; to cultivate within students the critical thinking skills, the concern for others and the courage it will take to transform their continent. Ashesi has 631 students from 22 countries. The school offers a four-year bachelors program grounded in a liberal core curriculum, featuring majors in Business Administration, Management Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Set on 100 acres in Berekuso, overlooking Ghana’s capital city of Accra, Ashesi’s campus unites traditional Ghanaian design, modern technology and environmental best practices.

No language studies

Founded in 2005, Bratislava International School of Liberal Arts (BISLA) is the first liberal arts college in Slovakia; its undergraduate degree programs aim to convey general knowledge and develop students’ intellectual capacity. BISLA currently has 14 faculty members (5 full-time) and 55 students. It intends to remain small and international in order to maintain an environment conducive to vigorous discussions. BISLA’s core curriculum is based on political science with offerings in other social science disciplines and the humanities, namely history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, theatre and fine arts, and literature.

No language studies other than English.

Effat University, which was founded in 1999, is the living legacy of Queen Effat’s vision for education. The institution is independent, embodies Islam’s quest for knowledge, truth and enlightenment, and educates tomorrow’s leaders by providing an interdisciplinary environment that is conducive to learning and research. Effat has a diverse group of 78 faculty members and approximately 900 female students from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America. The University has three colleges, namely The College of Humanities and Social Sciences, The College of Business and The College of Engineering and 12 departments with Architecture, Business programs offerings, Information Systems, and English & Translation being the largest undergraduate majors. An Executive Master for Islamic Financial Management (XIFM) program started in Fall of 2010.

English and Translation Studies only

Certificate/diploma programs in German, English, French, Turkish, Arabic for non-native speakers, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese are available, outsourced to the respective languages’ cultural institutes in the country. Information is provided through the Foreign Language Center.

Franklin University Switzerland is an American International institution of higher learning, established in 1969, whose sole campus lies in the city of Lugano, near the border with Italy. Franklin is accredited by the Middles States Commission on Higher Education in the US and its academic programs are recognized by OAQ/CUS, the Swiss accrediting agencies, making it the only institution with dual US-Swiss accreditation. Franklin’s emphasis is on international education and the liberal arts, which it integrates into a wide range of majors and interdisciplinary programs in the applied sciences and the humanities, including International Management; International Relations; International Banking and Finance; Environmental Studies; International Economics; Communications and Media Studies; Visual and Communication Arts; and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies. This global focus can also be seen in Franklin’s signature Academic Travel Program, in which each semester all students travel with faculty to destinations around the world for field work, service learning, or cultural immersion, for a total of nearly 40 such trips each academic year. In fall 2010, the College had 50 total faculty and 450 students, approximately 65% of whom from the US, 20% from Europe and 10% from the Middle East. Nearly 85% of the student body lives in college residences, which also contributes to purposeful intercultural learning. Under the auspices of Franklin’s newly formed Taylor Institute for Global Enterprise Management, in fall 2011 Franklin will launch its first Master’s program, an MSc in International Management, which has already been accepted for inclusion under Franklin’s accreditation by Middle States.

Italian and French Studies majors

Italian, French, and German Studies minors (- however, I don’t see anybody on the faculty teaching German, it could be outsourced.)

International Christian University is Japan’s first liberal arts college. It was founded in 1953 based on Christian principles, with the aim of “cultivating capable individuals, educated as internationally minded citizens, who will serve both God and people and who will contribute to lasting peace.” ICU offers a fully bilingual education in Japanese and English. The liberal arts education, provided by its undergraduate college, allows students to pursue an in-depth study in any of approximately 30 majors. At the same time, this education highlights the dynamic possibilities that can emerge as students experience areas that transcend and connect academic disciplines. The ICU tradition emphasizes interaction, and its campus offers an environment where students can interact fluently with faculty and staff outside the classroom. This campus, without parallel, was provided to ICU in the wake of the destruction from World War II, through the generous donations of a great many people who supported the university’s founding principles.

Language Education Program does not teach a foreign language but teaches how to teach it, here only English and Japanese are listed as such courses.

John Cabot University was founded in 1972 and endeavors to provide an educational experience firmly rooted in the American tradition of the liberal arts and solidly international in orientation. The academic programs are designed to fully harness the strengths of its multicultural faculty and an international student body, as well as the extraordinarily-rich culture and history of Rome and its environs. John Cabot has over 100 faculty members (13 full-time), and 360 degree-seeking and 500 visiting students from the United States, Italy and the European Union writ large. It offers 13 majors, including International Business, Communications and International Affairs.

John Cabot in Rome, Italy offers English and Italian studies but does not teach foreign languages beyond these.

Lingnan University was originally founded in Guangzhou, China in 1888, moved to Hong Kong as Lingnan College in 1967,  and became again Lingnan University in 1999.  Lingnan is committed to a quality education distinguished by the best liberal arts traditions.  There are approximately 2,600 undergraduate students–the majority living on campus–and 188 faculty memers.  Lingnan guarantees on-campus residence for all non-local students.  Liberal arts education at Lingnan University aims to instill a sense of civic duty in its students and to cultivate skills, competencies and sensibilities that enable graduates to pursue their goals in an increasingly integrated and rapidly changing social, cultural and economic environment.

Lingnan has a Department of English, of Chinese, and of Translation Studies, but teaches no additional foreign languages.

FLAME University

FLAME University is a state private university established at Pune (India) under the FLAME University Act 2014 of the Government of Maharashtra State (India) and is recognized by the University Grants Commission (UGC), the higher education regulator in India. FLAME University is the pioneer of liberal education in India. The University’s main objective is to offer an inter-disciplinary platform of education that provides both breadth and depth in diverse areas of knowledge, and in the process instill a habit of lifelong learning and inquiry amongst students, leading to the advancement of their well-being. The liberal education ethos at FLAME University inculcates leadership and risk-taking abilities in students and focuses on discovering one’s passion. The student-centric learning is delivered by esteemed faculty scholars in a world-class campus setting. At the core of everything FLAME University does, is a desire to give something back to society in a noble manner.

French, German, Japanese, Persian, Sanskrit, Spanish

FLAME India – Language Offerings

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Digital Pedagogy

Resources

Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age: Designing for 21st Century Learning 

Allen, Wendy W. (2014, January). “Developing Cultural Proficiency.” The Language Educator Magazine. ACTFL. Retrieved from: http://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/TLE_Jan14.pdf

Bennett, Brian. (2012, May). Redesigning Learning in a Flipped Classroom.

Byrne, Richard. Free Technology for Teachers: A Comparison of Blogging Platforms

Edudemic: The 10 Best Web Tools for Flipped Classrooms; The Teacher’s Guide to Flipped Classrooms

Edutopia: Flipped Classroom

Flipped Learning Network

Gonzalez, Jennifer. Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The In-Class Version

Kirch, Crystal. Flipping with Kirch.

Transparent Language. Flip Your Language Classroom the Right Way.

Videos:

Creating a Free WordPress Blog – Tutorial for Beginners

The Flipped Class: Overcoming Common Hurdles

How to Set Up a Blog from Scratch Using Blogger.com

General Best Practices 

How to not be a Helicopter Professor and why that matters for us and our students.

Hands-on digital exercises: 

Speaking Proficiency

Writing Proficiency

Reading Proficiency

Listening Proficiency

Intercultural Learning

Digital Tools:

Collection of Digital Tools for Teaching and Learning with Categories Filter

Inventory of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Tools and Open Educational Resources

Denison U Library Collection

Zoom Video-Conferencing Tool

Google+ Hangouts 

EdPuzzle

eduCanon

Screenr

Zaption

Blendspace

Screencast

Flubaroo

Lesson Writer (English only)

Learning Apps – make your own exercises (various languages)

Collection of E-Learning Apps with Examples (Book)

Speaking 

Enhancing Pronunciation and Intonation

Students can video-record themselves on Zoom (here reading a poem), upload video to Dropbox and share link with instructor for review.

Reading, recording, sharing a poem with Zoom (See “Donnerstag”)

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Video Recording of Instructor Modeling Reading

Easy Generator

http://elearning.easygenerator.com/1c49d0b8-a0d4-408d-b7d2-551171fd23f1

 

 

Intercultural 

Global Partner Student Introductions

Saddan Genao Lizardo, an international Denison student from the Dominican Republic, is introduced by AUBG student Uje from Mongolia. Uje created a PPT presentation for her intermediate German class with Dr. Stantcheva/AUBG.

Saddan Genao Lizardo complete PPT.

Saddan at Denison and his home
counrty

 

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